On the passing of Steven Bochco…

On the passing of Steven Bochco I was reminded of the wonderful opportunity I had to interview him for Written By Magazine back in 2010 thanks to the aide of my former boss, Kenny Johnson, who was a former college buddy and lifetime friend of Mr. Bochco. That was the year of the (deservedly) failed re-imagining of The Bionic Woman and talk of film versions of 21 Jump Street  and The A Team so I had come up with an article idea to interview the creative geniuses behind the originals. 

I emailed Kenny to see if he would sit for the interview, and if he thought his friends the two Steves (Bochco and Cannel) would do the same. He called around and they all said yes. I had only to approach Don Bellisario on my own to fill out the foursome and I was on my way. Funny thing was I had told Kenny about the story idea but admitted I was swamped finishing my PhD so I might not get to it for another few months. Kenny encouraged me to go for it “now” – so I did – and in the course of seeing the article through to publication, Mr. Cannell passed away of cancer only his family and friends knew about – including Kenny. So Kenny had urged me to work in the piece knowing I wouldn’t be able to include Mr. Cannell if I waited too long. The magazine was able to collect letters from writers who had been given their start at the Cannell company and publish a tribute to him alongside my article.

On the passing of Steven Bochco...

Now we’ve lost Mr. Bochco as well – a man I never had the chance to work with, but whom I have always admired. Even today I rave to my one-hour drama students about “Hearts and Souls” – the NYPD BLUE episode where Jimmy Smits’ character Bobby Simone dies (story by Bochco, David Milch and Bill Clark, teleplay by Nicholas Wootton- and I get tears in my eyes just recounting the story to them all these years later.  He truly created what we now call the 2nd Golden Age of Television Drama from Hill Street Blues forward, though NYPD BLUE will always be my favorite. 

I still have the book about the making of the show on a list for my MFA students to review — True Blue: The Real Stories Behind NYPD Blue Hardcover by David Milch and Bill Clark. Do yourself a favor and binge watch some of his work this weekend.

Read the entire article – The Class of ‘80

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05 The Origins of Doctor Who from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse [Video] (0:51)

Watch this entire presentation: Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse: Paving the Way for a Lady Doctor with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (36:58)

05 The Origins of Doctor Who from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse [Video] (0:51)

For her 5th Doctor Who lecture to the CPP community, Dr. Rosanne Welch discusses how society – and the show’s writing staff – prepared the audience for a major change in this 50-year franchise – the creation of the first Lady Doctor!

Transcript:

Sydney Newman and Verity, like I said, were the producers who concocted an idea of a show that was meant for children and it as meant to teach children history. So, they invented a character who traveled through time and space — go to various historical events and experience them and it was meant to be a children’s show which is why, if you know old Who, you know that it’s a lot of plastic dinosaurs and goofy, funny-looking creatures and it’s not very scary. it’s much funnier than it is scary and that’s fine. That was the style of program that it was. Right? So these guys came up with it. William Hartnell was the first Doctor. He was meant to be a grandfatherly type. A wise gentleman who travels through space and time with this granddaughter, Susan, and then Barbara and Ian are her teachers who accidentally wander into the spaceship one day and ended up going on these adventures.

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Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch teaches the History of Screenwriting and One-Hour Drama for the Stephens College MFA in Screenwriting.

Writing/producing credits include Beverly Hills 90210, Picket Fences, ABCNEWS: Nightline and Touched by an Angel. In 2016 she published the book Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop; co-edited Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia; and placed “Transmitting Culture Transnationally Via the Characterization of Parents in Police Procedurals” in the New Review of Film and Television Studies. Essays appear in Torchwood Declassified: Investigating Mainstream Cult Television and Doctor Who and Race: An Anthology. Welch serves as Book Reviews editor for Journal of Screenwriting and on the Editorial Advisory Board for Written By magazine, the magazine of the Writers Guild.

Watch Dr. Welch’s talk “The Importance of Having a Female Voice in the Room” at the 2016 TEDxCPP.

Why The Monkees Matter Book discussed on Zilch Podcast #113 A Trip To The Monkees Library!

Why The Monkees Matter Book discussed on Zilch Podcast #113 A Trip To The Monkees Library!

Why The Monkees Matter Book discussed on Zilch Podcast #113 A Trip To The Monkees Library!

Listen to the podcast

Why The Monkees Matter Discussion starts at 18:48 in the audio podcast.

Many thanks to my friends at Zilch who posted a new episode called “A TRIP TO THE MONKEES LIBRARY!” where they ranked their favorite books about the Monkees and spent a few fun minutes talking about what they liked about “Why the Monkees Matter” – it was especially fun to hear Sarah recount the fabulous time we spent at the 50th anniversary show in St. Louis, our chance to do a photo op with Micky and Peter afterwards, though she forgot to mention our midnight munch out at the Cracker Barrel next to our hotel.

Why The Monkees Matter Book discussed on Zilch Podcast #113 A Trip To The Monkees Library!


 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

    

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A History of Screenwriting 58 – Smilin’ Through starring Norma Talmadge, Written by Alan Langdon Martin (aka Jane Murfin and Jane Cowl) (original play), James Ashmore Creelman (scenario), Sidney Franklin (scenario) – 1922

A History of Screenwriting 58 – Smilin’ Through starring Norma Talmadge, Written by Alan Langdon Martin (aka Jane Murfin and Jane Cowl) (original play),
James Ashmore Creelman (scenario), Sidney Franklin (scenario) – 1922

A History of Screenwriting 58 - Smilin' Through starring Norma Talmadge, Written by Alan Langdon Martin (aka Jane Murfin and Jane Cowl) (original play), 
James Ashmore Creelman (scenario), Sidney Franklin (scenario) - 1922

Smilin’ Through is a 1922 silent film based on the 1919 play of the same name, written by Jane Cowl and Jane Murfin (together under the pseudonym Alan Langdon Martin). The film starred Norma Talmadge, Harrison Ford, and Wyndham Standing. It was co-written and directed by Sidney Franklin, who also directed the more famous 1932 remake at MGM. The film was produced by Talmadge and her husband Joseph M. Schenck for her company, the Norma Talmadge Film Corporation. It was released by First National Pictures. Popular character actor Gene Lockhart made his screen debut in this film.[3][4]

The story is essentially the same as the popular Jane Cowl play, with Talmadge in the dual role of Kathleen and Moonyean. Kathleen, a young Irish woman, is in love with Kenneth Wayne but is prevented from marrying him by her guardian John Carteret. John is haunted by memories of his thwarted love for Kathleen’s aunt, Moonyean.

The story was an especially popular one and was filmed twice more by MGM: in 1932 with Norma Shearer and 1941 with Jeanette MacDonald. – Wikipedia


Learn More About Norma Talmadge with these books

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** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
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14 Gendered Writing and Gidget from How Gidget Got Into the Girl Ghetto with Dr. Rosanne Welch – SRN Conference 2017

14 Gendered Writing and Gidget from How Gidget Got Into the Girl Ghetto with Dr. Rosanne Welch – SRN Conference 2017

14 Gendered Writing and Gidget from How Gidget Got Into the Girl Ghetto with Dr. Rosanne Welch - SRN Conference 2017

Watch this entire presentation

 

Transcript:

Now we think about the gendered writing that happened. In this case, an episode written by Irma Kalish who is very famous and Auston who was her husband at the time. This whole thing focuses on her having to a write a paper. She’s not doing well until she writes about what she knows, which is surfing and when she does that she actually gets the A she needs in the class. She’s very interested in her grades. She’s not a fluffy, superficial girl. She wants good grades. She wants to go to college. She takes her work seriously and that impressed me. I also think there is a little genre I want to do some studies on eventually — How many movies actually are the story of writers finding their own voice. The Little Women stories are really not about little girls playing in their house in New England. It’s about one woman discovering her voice with the successful telling of her family’s stories. I think there are a million films and stories that end up being about writers finding their voice so, you know, we are writing about what we know all the time.

At this year’s 10th Annual Screenwriting Research Network Conference at Otago University in Dunedin, New Zealand I presented…

“How Gidget Got Into the Girl Ghetto by Accident (and How We Can Get Her Out of it): Demoting Gidget: The Little Girl with Big Ideas from Edgy Coming of Age Novel to Babe on the Beach Genre Film via Choices made in the Adaptation Process.”

It’ a long title, as I joke up front, but covers the process of adapting the true life story of Kathy Kohner (nicknamed ‘Gidget’ by the group of male surfers who she spent the summers with in Malibu in the 1950s) into the film and television series that are better remembered than the novel. The novel had been well-received upon publication, even compared to A Catcher in the Rye, but has mistakenly been relegated to the ‘girl ghetto’ of films. Some of the adaptations turned the focus away from the coming of age story of a young woman who gained respect for her talent at a male craft – surfing – and instead turned the focus far too much on Kathy being boy crazy.

Along the way I found interesting comparisons between how female writers treated the main character while adapting the novel and how male writers treated the character.

Gidget


Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch teaches the History of Screenwriting and One-Hour Drama for the Stephens College MFA in Screenwriting.

Writing/producing credits include Beverly Hills 90210, Picket Fences, ABCNEWS: Nightline and Touched by an Angel. In 2016 she published the book Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop; co-edited Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia; and placed “Transmitting Culture Transnationally Via the Characterization of Parents in Police Procedurals” in the New Review of Film and Television Studies. Essays appear in Torchwood Declassified: Investigating Mainstream Cult Television and Doctor Who and Race: An Anthology. Welch serves as Book Reviews editor for Journal of Screenwriting and on the Editorial Advisory Board for Written By magazine, the magazine of the Writers Guild.

Watch Dr. Welch’s talk “The Importance of Having a Female Voice in the Room” at the 2016 TEDxCPP.


SRN logo red

The Screenwriting Research Network is a research group consisting of scholars, reflective practitioners and practice-based researchers interested in research on screenwriting. The aim is to rethink the screenplay in relation to its histories, theories, values and creative practices.

Quote from “America’s Forgotten Founding Father” by Dr Rosanne Welch – 4 in a series – To Medical School

Quote from

“Ten years later Filippo, serious and lean at seventeen, stood on Piazza Santa Maria Nuova in Florence, at the gates of Santa Maria Nuova Hospital, unsure of if he could even enter a place with such an imposing history. Founded in 1288 by Folco Portinari, the father of the beloved Beatrice of Dante’s Divine Comedy, Santa Maria Nuova was also the place where Da Vinci had once been a medical intern, as Filippo was about to be.”

 From America’s Forgotten Founding Father — Get Your Copy Today!


Join the Rosanne Welch Mailing List for future book and event announcements!
 

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04 The Importance of Writers to Doctor Who from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse [Video] (1:04)

Watch this entire presentation: Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse: Paving the Way for a Lady Doctor with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (36:58)

04 The Importance of Writers to Doctor Who from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse [Video] (1:04)

For her 5th Doctor Who lecture to the CPP community, Dr. Rosanne Welch discusses how society – and the show’s writing staff – prepared the audience for a major change in this 50-year franchise – the creation of the first Lady Doctor!

Transcript:

I come from a writing background, so as far as I am concerned, it’s all down to the writing. Writing Matters. People who are writers, who are the people in our culture who tell us stories, it matters who they are and it matters that we open the doors to people who tell stories from lots of different backgrounds because that’s how we get a plethora of multi-cultural stories that we can share. We should all see ourselves at some point in our lives as heroes because you are the hero in your own life. Unless you take charge and do things, nothing really will happen to you and if you don’t see that media you start to think that somebody else is supposed to take charge. So, I think writing matters. That’s always a theme behind what I do so I am going to start by looking at some of the writers of Doctor Who across the years. It’s always important who invented a thing and our first people are Sydney Newman and Verity Lambert, a woman, a producer not a writer helped to invent the show of Doctor Who. It Anthony Coburn who wrote the first episode and then we’ll go down through the years and see all these guys and what their effect on the show has been leading up to the modern day.

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter and Instagram
https://twitter.com/rosannewelchhttp://instagram.com/drrosannewelch

 

Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch teaches the History of Screenwriting and One-Hour Drama for the Stephens College MFA in Screenwriting.

Writing/producing credits include Beverly Hills 90210, Picket Fences, ABCNEWS: Nightline and Touched by an Angel. In 2016 she published the book Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop; co-edited Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia; and placed “Transmitting Culture Transnationally Via the Characterization of Parents in Police Procedurals” in the New Review of Film and Television Studies. Essays appear in Torchwood Declassified: Investigating Mainstream Cult Television and Doctor Who and Race: An Anthology. Welch serves as Book Reviews editor for Journal of Screenwriting and on the Editorial Advisory Board for Written By magazine, the magazine of the Writers Guild.

Watch Dr. Welch’s talk “The Importance of Having a Female Voice in the Room” at the 2016 TEDxCPP.

Quote from “America’s Forgotten Founding Father” by Dr Rosanne Welch – 3 in a series – Dreaming of travel…and America

Quote from

“Filippo had a restless spirit. He questioned everything and wanted always to know why unfairness and injustice seemed to thrive in the world. Often, the young boy’s mind wandered off on such questions. Other days he dreamed of the far off places he would someday see. Florence, which was more than ten whole miles away. Or England. India with its spices and the Taj Mahal he had seen drawings of in Professor Rosati’s books. Or that fantasy land across the ocean, discovered by an Italian over a hundred and forty years before.”

 From America’s Forgotten Founding Father — Get Your Copy Today!


Join the Rosanne Welch Mailing List for future book and event announcements!
 

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A History of Screenwriting 57 – New York Nights starring Norma Talmadge, Written by Hugh Stanislaus Stange and Jules Furthman – 1929

A History of Screenwriting 57 – New York Nights starring Norma Talmadge, Written by Hugh Stanislaus Stange and Jules Furthman – 1929

A History of Screenwriting 57 - New York Nights starring Norma Talmadge, Written by Hugh Stanislaus Stange and Jules Furthman - 1929

Poster - New York Nights (1929) 01.jpg
By Employee(s) of United Artists – http://doctormacro.com/Movie%20Summaries/N/New%20York%20Nights%20%281929%29.htm, Public Domain, Link

New York Nights is a 1929 American pre-Code crime film, directed by Lewis Milestone, and based on 1928 play Tin Pan Alley by Hugh Stanislaus Stange.[2] The film is known for being leading actress Norma Talmadge’s first sound film.

Jill Deverne is a chorus girl married to alcoholic composer Fred. She wants to show Fred’s latest song, A Year From Today, to racketeer Joe Prividi. Prividi is the producer of the musical show in which she is working, and agrees to use his song. Fred, however, refuses any favors and rejects Prividi’s offer. When Prividi uses the song anyway, Fred and his friend Johnny Dolan become drunk and show up at a nightclub.

In a raid, the police discover Fred with chorus girl Ruthie. Jill is disgusted with his behavior and dumps him. She is soon courted by Prividi, who is very overprotective. At a private party, a gambler forces himself on her and is shot by Prividi. Prividi is arrested and sent to jail. Jill does not want to be left behind, and plans a future with Fred. Prividi becomes jealous and sends gunmen to shoot and kill Fred. He is eventually stopped and put in jail, while Jill and Fred ride off in a train to start a new life. – Wikipedia


Learn More About Norma Talmadge with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available at the LA Public Library

Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 94 in a series – Corporate Control

** Buy “Why The Monkees Matter” Today **

Quotes from

Nesmith reacted to the corporate control of their music in an interview after the cancellation of the program when he expressed the idea that the music establishment might have been jealous of their immediate success and denied them recognition as musicians. “People think we’re tools of the establishment,” he says, “but we’re not. We’re really the truest expression of the iconoclastic youth of today.”

from Why The Monkees Matter by Dr. Rosanne Welch —  Buy your Copy today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

    

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition