Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Opening Remarks at The Industry in Our Backyard: Television Production in Los Angeles 1940s-1980s [Photo]

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Opening Remarks at The Industry in Our Backyard: Television Production in Los Angeles 1940s-1980s [Photo]

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Dr. Rosanne Welch presents her opening remarks for the photo exhibition…

The Industry in Our Backyard: Television Production in Los Angeles 1940s-1980s

Runs Thursday, January 18, 2018 to Sunday, July 15, 2018 Central Library, History and Genealogy Department, LL4

From Lucy to ALF, from game shows to talk shows, from local news to the made-for-TV movie, The Industry In Our Backyard: Television Production In Los Angeles 1940s-1980s showcases four decades in the life of the medium that dominated American culture, yet for Angelenos, was just another part of daily life. The images displayed in the exhibit were largely taken by photographers from the Herald Examiner and the Valley Times newspapers, who were granted exclusive access to back lots, sound stages and location shoots around town for their TV sections. These photos, which have not been seen in as many as sixty-five years when they first ran in the papers, provide rare glimpses of the earliest L.A. stations, the crews at work and the stars in action.

The exhibit runs from January 18 through July 15, 2018, along with a series of presentations given by television industry professionals and archivists.

 

Exhibit sponsored by Photo Friends, a nonprofit organization that supports the Los Angeles Public Library’s Photo Collection/History & Genealogy Department at Central Library.

The “A Film By” Credit and Writers from Giving Voice to Silent Films and the Far From Silent Women Who Wrote Them with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video]

Watch this entire presentation

The “A Film By” Credit and Writers from Giving Voice to Silent Films and the Far From Silent Women Who Wrote Them with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video]

The

 

A recording of my presentation at this year’s University Film and Video Association (UFVA) 2017 conference.

Transcript:

The other thing we argue about at the Writers Guild all the time is that we have this business where we have a credit that’s always “A Film By” the director. If he is a writer/director, fine. Ok, but if there’s nothing of that than why does he get this credit and why don’t the writers get that credit and we can’t get rid of that because the Director Guild will not get rid of it. Makes me nuts. Makes me nuts. Makes me nuts. But it’s true.

So this perpetually puts it in the audience’s and the student’s mind that this is the person to credit for that movie and it is not true. Same thing, obviously we know all these wonderful movies by Spike Lee. In the beginning, yes, he did write and direct “She’s Gotta Have It” but he did Malcolm X with Arnold Pearl. We don’t remember Arnold Pearl and he did Chi-Raq with Kevin Willmott and of course, he adapted that from Aristophanes and Lysistrata. So, let’s remember that there were other writers involve but they’re still only A Spike Lee Joint. That’s the only credit that’s given above the title and that’s something that we’re fighting against in our classes.

Books Mentioned In This Presentation

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From The Research Vault: College Enrollment Levels, National Center for Education Statistics 1968-1998

College Enrollment Levels, National Center for Education Statistics 1968-1998

From The Research Vault: College Enrollment Levels, National Center for Education Statistics 1968-1998

Table 187 

College enrollment rates of high school graduates, by sex: 1960 to 1998 [Numbers in thousands]

Read the entire article – College Enrollment Levels, National Center for Education Statistics 1968-1998


 

Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

    

Order Your Copy Now!

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Opening Remarks at The Industry in Our Backyard: Television Production in Los Angeles 1940s-1980s [Video]

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Opening Remarks at The Industry in Our Backyard: Television Production in Los Angeles 1940s-1980s [Video]

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents Opening Remarks at The Industry in Our Backyard: : Television Production in Los Angeles 1940s-1980s [Video]

 

Dr. Rosanne Welch presents her opening remarks for the photo exhibition…

The Industry in Our Backyard: Television Production in Los Angeles 1940s-1980s

Runs Thursday, January 18, 2018 to Sunday, July 15, 2018 Central Library, History and Genealogy Department, LL4

From Lucy to ALF, from game shows to talk shows, from local news to the made-for-TV movie, The Industry In Our Backyard: Television Production In Los Angeles 1940s-1980s showcases four decades in the life of the medium that dominated American culture, yet for Angelenos, was just another part of daily life. The images displayed in the exhibit were largely taken by photographers from the Herald Examiner and the Valley Times newspapers, who were granted exclusive access to back lots, sound stages and location shoots around town for their TV sections. These photos, which have not been seen in as many as sixty-five years when they first ran in the papers, provide rare glimpses of the earliest L.A. stations, the crews at work and the stars in action.

The exhibit runs from January 18 through July 15, 2018, along with a series of presentations given by television industry professionals and archivists.

Exhibit sponsored by Photo Friends, a nonprofit organization that supports the Los Angeles Public Library’s Photo Collection/History & Genealogy Department at Central Library.

Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 87 in a series – Mike the Father Figure

** Buy “Why The Monkees Matter” Today **

Quotes from

Whether it was due to his being older (than Dolenz and Jones but not Tork), or due to his being tall, or because he was already a father in real life, Mike did provide the father figure from the start. The program provided the fantasy of a father-knows-best-less house, but because of Mike they had a father.

from Why The Monkees Matter by Dr. Rosanne Welch —  Buy your Copy today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

    

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition

A History of Screenwriting 52 – It starring Clara Bow – Written by Hope Loring, Louis D. Lighton and George Marion Jr. – 1927

A History of Screenwriting 52 – It starring Clara Bow – Written by Hope Loring, Louis D. Lighton and George Marion Jr. – 1927

A History of Screenwriting 52 - It starring Clara Bow - Written by Hope Loring, Louis D. Lighton and George Marion Jr. - 1927

“It” is a 1927 silent romantic comedy film that tells the story of a shop girl who sets her sights on the handsome, wealthy boss of the department store where she works. It is based on a novella by Elinor Glyn that was originally serialized in Cosmopolitan magazine.

This film turned actress Clara Bow into a major star, and led people to label her the It girl.

The film had its world premiere in Los Angeles on January 14, 1927, followed by a New York showing on February 5, 1927. “It” was released to the general public on February 19, 1927.

The picture was considered lost for many years, but a Nitrate-copy was found in Prague in the 1960s.[1] In 2001, “It” was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”. — Wikipedia


Learn More About Clara Bow with these books

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Now Available/Launch Party: America’s Forgotten Founding Father: A Novel Based on the Life of Filippo Mazzei by Rosanne Welch

Now available in print and Kindle Pre-Order from Amazon.com.

* See below for Launch Party Information

I’m deeply pleased to announce the publication of my novel America’s Forgotten Founding Father: A Novel Based on the Life of Filippo Mazzei as part of the Mentoris Series of books celebrating the Italian-American experience and foster an appreciation of history and culture. 

With all the hoopla surrounding Alexander Hamilton (thanks to Lin Manuel Miranda’s seminal musical), I was just as surprised to learn about this Italian-American patriot who owned the plantation next door to Thomas Jefferson – but chose not to own slaves.  Rather he worked at establishing a vineyard with the help of other Italian immigrants (whose children and grandchildren helped populate Virginia according to records kept at Monticello).  

Alongside Jefferson, Mazzei wrote articles in support of the Revolution and is now credited with coining the phrase “All Men are Created Equal”, which Jefferson found so inspiring he added it to his Declaration. As the Revolutionary War waged on, Jefferson and other Founding Fathers asked Mazzei to return to Europe and solicit funds, weapons and other support from the leading countries of Europe, which he gladly did, though it separated him from the beloved country he had adopted.  

Mazzei cover

Launch Party

If you’re in Los Angeles I invite you to join us as we toast the launch of this wonderful series of books. We’ll hear from publisher Robert Barbera, editor Ken Lazebnik and then I and Kate Fuglei (Fermi’s Gifts) will read short passages from our work.  

Thursday February 15th at 6pm
Italian Cultural Institute in Westwood
1023 Hilgard Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90024. (Map)

Parking on the street or in local lots.

This event is by Invite Only. Please RSVP by February 10, 2018 to rosanne@welchwrite.com

Print Edition | Kindle Edition
* Also available in Nook and Apple iBooks formats

His loyalty lasted a lifetime…

Surgeon, merchant, vintner, and writer Filippo Mazzei influenced American business, politics, and philosophy. Befriending Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson, Mazzei was a strong liaison for others in Europe. Mazzei was Jefferson’s inspiration for the most famous line in the Declaration of Independence: “All men are created equal.”

Clearly, Mazzei had a gift of language and often used his words to share his ideas about religious freedom. Mazzei encouraged other Italians still living overseas to join him in a country rich with opportunity and promise. Often, when returning from Italy, he booked passages on ships for people who desired to travel to America and employed them on his estate—just to ensure a better, more fruitful life for everyone. During those travels, Mazzei found himself at the center of many fights for freedom.

He was truly a friend to freedom around the world.

04 The Real Gidget from How Gidget Got Into the Girl Ghetto – Dr. Rosanne Welch – SRN Conference 2017

04 The Real Gidget from How Gidget Got Into the Girl Ghetto – Dr. Rosanne Welch – SRN Conference 2017

04 The Real Gidget from How Gidget Got Into the Girl Ghetto - Dr. Rosanne Welch - SRN Conference 2017

Watch this entire presentation

 

Transcript:

Now, this piece of dialog really made me really made me cringe. Oooh, why would a girl ever say that about her own life and yet this is the line given to Gidget by the male writers. So this is something that I found along the way.

As far as the adaptation of Gidget, it all started again with an actual real girl and her real words. Kathy Kohner was a Jewish young girl and her father was a television writer. She lived in Beverly Hills and one summer in her year between 16 and 17 she went to the beach every day and discovered this community of surfing males — no girls allowed — and she didn’t fall in love with the boys. She fell in love with the sport and what really bothered me was that is what her book is about. How hard she tried to be such a good surfer the men would take her seriously.

At this year’s 10th Annual Screenwriting Research Network Conference at Otago University in Dunedin, New Zealand I presented…

“How Gidget Got Into the Girl Ghetto by Accident (and How We Can Get Her Out of it): Demoting Gidget: The Little Girl with Big Ideas from Edgy Coming of Age Novel to Babe on the Beach Genre Film via Choices made in the Adaptation Process.”

It’ a long title, as I joke up front, but covers the process of adapting the true life story of Kathy Kohner (nicknamed ‘Gidget’ by the group of male surfers who she spent the summers with in Malibu in the 1950s) into the film and television series that are better remembered than the novel. The novel had been well-received upon publication, even compared to A Catcher in the Rye, but has mistakenly been relegated to the ‘girl ghetto’ of films. Some of the adaptations turned the focus away from the coming of age story of a young woman who gained respect for her talent at a male craft – surfing – and instead turned the focus far too much on Kathy being boy crazy.

Along the way I found interesting comparisons between how female writers treated the main character while adapting the novel and how male writers treated the character.

Gidget


Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch teaches the History of Screenwriting and One-Hour Drama for the Stephens College MFA in Screenwriting.

Writing/producing credits include Beverly Hills 90210, Picket Fences, ABCNEWS: Nightline and Touched by an Angel. In 2016 she published the book Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop; co-edited Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia; and placed “Transmitting Culture Transnationally Via the Characterization of Parents in Police Procedurals” in the New Review of Film and Television Studies. Essays appear in Torchwood Declassified: Investigating Mainstream Cult Television and Doctor Who and Race: An Anthology. Welch serves as Book Reviews editor for Journal of Screenwriting and on the Editorial Advisory Board for Written By magazine, the magazine of the Writers Guild.

Watch Dr. Welch’s talk “The Importance of Having a Female Voice in the Room” at the 2016 TEDxCPP.


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The Screenwriting Research Network is a research group consisting of scholars, reflective practitioners and practice-based researchers interested in research on screenwriting. The aim is to rethink the screenplay in relation to its histories, theories, values and creative practices.

From The Research Vault: Peter Tork at peace with post-Monkees career, The Morning Call, June 2, 2012

Peter Tork at peace with post-Monkees career, The Morning Call, June 2, 2012

Peter Tork at peace with post-Monkees career, The Morning Call, June 2, 2012

Peter Tork figures that, had he never become a member of 1960s television pop-rock band The Monkees, he still would have had a music career.

“It would have been exactly the same,” Tork says in a recent call from his Connecticut home.

“Well, it wouldn’t have been as large and as loud, probably. That was an extraordinary phenomenon. But I would have been a folky blues-rocker solo singer-songwriter. I probably would have been playing small clubs all my life.”

Read the entire article – Peter Tork at peace with post-Monkees career, The Morning Call, June 2, 2012


 

Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

    

Order Your Copy Now!

More on Goodrich and Hackett from Giving Voice to Silent Films and the Far From Silent Women Who Wrote Them with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video]

Watch this entire presentation

More on Goodrich and Hackett from Giving Voice to Silent Films and the Far From Silent Women Who Wrote Them with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video]

More on Goodrich and Hackett from Giving Voice to Silent Films and the Far From Silent Women Who Wrote Them with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video]

 

A recording of my presentation at this year’s University Film and Video Association (UFVA) 2017 conference.

Transcript:

Also, if you look at the differences between the novel and the movie, in the novel, they’re kind of flighty and silly. In the movie, they love each other. They’re adorable to each other. This is the marriage of Frances and Albert Hackett. This is not Dashiell Hammett and Lillian Hellman because they were never actually married, because, as we know, Hammett never left his wife. So that wasn’t a marriage and that wasn’t two people who understood a marriage. They had a relationship that was entirely different than the one that appears on the screen. That comes from the writers who adapted the movie who don’t get any credit which makes me nuts. So, why do we study screenwriting history? Because we need to know these stories and we need to pass those stories on to our students so they pay attention to who wrote the movie because that’s the person who’s message you’re accepting into your life when you see that movie.

Books Mentioned In This Presentation

Follow Dr. Rosanne Welch

Twitter: https://twitter.com/rosannewelch
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drrosannewelch/