18 Lack of Chivalry from How Gidget Got Into the Girl Ghetto with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (0:50)

18 Lack of Chivalry from How Gidget Got Into the Girl Ghetto with Dr. Rosanne Welch

18 Lack of Chivalry from How Gidget Got Into the Girl Ghetto with Dr. Rosanne Welch

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Transcript:

Backward again we go to a boy writing the show. The boyfriends always wait until the last minute to call the girls for a date because they have to see if there is good surf. If there’s good surf they won’t call them for dates. Gidget decides that that’s being treated dis-respectively. We should all make a plan to do something else so when the boys call at the last minute we’re already busy. So they do that. They have a sleepover party at her house. The problem is, the girlfriends all get calls from their boyfriends and they leave the party. Better to be with boys than to be with their girlfriends, right? So her plan fails, which is kind of sad and at the end, this is her weak…weak ass…lesson. “As far as courtesy and respect are concerned, if a boy meets you halfway, that’s good enough.” I don’t understand. You know, I love guys. Hello, I’m married to a guy. I have a son, but what is this writing women as little weak girls. It is very sad.

At this year’s 10th Annual Screenwriting Research Network Conference at Otago University in Dunedin, New Zealand I presented…

“How Gidget Got Into the Girl Ghetto by Accident (and How We Can Get Her Out of it): Demoting Gidget: The Little Girl with Big Ideas from Edgy Coming of Age Novel to Babe on the Beach Genre Film via Choices made in the Adaptation Process.”

It’ a long title, as I joke up front, but covers the process of adapting the true life story of Kathy Kohner (nicknamed ‘Gidget’ by the group of male surfers who she spent the summers with in Malibu in the 1950s) into the film and television series that are better remembered than the novel. The novel had been well-received upon publication, even compared to A Catcher in the Rye, but has mistakenly been relegated to the ‘girl ghetto’ of films. Some of the adaptations turned the focus away from the coming of age story of a young woman who gained respect for her talent at a male craft – surfing – and instead turned the focus far too much on Kathy being boy crazy.

Along the way I found interesting comparisons between how female writers treated the main character while adapting the novel and how male writers treated the character.

Gidget


Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch teaches the History of Screenwriting and One-Hour Drama for the Stephens College MFA in Screenwriting.

Writing/producing credits include Beverly Hills 90210, Picket Fences, ABCNEWS: Nightline and Touched by an Angel. In 2016 she published the book Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop; co-edited Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia; and placed “Transmitting Culture Transnationally Via the Characterization of Parents in Police Procedurals” in the New Review of Film and Television Studies. Essays appear in Torchwood Declassified: Investigating Mainstream Cult Television and Doctor Who and Race: An Anthology. Welch serves as Book Reviews editor for Journal of Screenwriting and on the Editorial Advisory Board for Written By magazine, the magazine of the Writers Guild.

Watch Dr. Welch’s talk “The Importance of Having a Female Voice in the Room” at the 2016 TEDxCPP.


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The Screenwriting Research Network is a research group consisting of scholars, reflective practitioners and practice-based researchers interested in research on screenwriting. The aim is to rethink the screenplay in relation to its histories, theories, values and creative practices.

08 MacGyver, Douglas Adams and Doctor Who from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse [Video] (1:10)

Watch this entire presentation: Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse: Paving the Way for a Lady Doctor with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (36:58)

08 MacGyver, Douglas Adams and Doctor Who from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse

For her 5th Doctor Who lecture to the CPP community, Dr. Rosanne Welch discusses how society – and the show’s writing staff – prepared the audience for a major change in this 50-year franchise – the creation of the first Lady Doctor!

Transcript:

Now if you know anything about the old, and new, MacGyver, very similar to Doctor Who in that MacGyver doesn’t carry a gun. he makes changes in the world with his brains his science knowledge and his ability to think fast in a situation. So in essence, nobody knew it but he was an American Doctor Who if you think about it. That personality of male and I have to cop to the fact that I haven’t watched the new MacGyver. I’ll bet you that it’s lovely but I can’t get past Richard Dean Anderson. That’s my MacGyver, so too bad. But that’s what Terry Nation brought into the story. Many of you, if you’re science fiction fans will know Douglas Adams. Maybe not from Doctor Who but he did, in fact, did write for Doctor Who and was a story editor for one season. So, of course, we know him from The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy. He wrote a few episodes of Doctor Who including The Pirate Planet and he worked with this character, Romana, who was a lady Timelord. So naturally, we know that in their alien species there were female characters and she’s intelligent and she matches the Doctor for wit and for charm and all that so we had the early feeling of, there can be women doing this adventuring.

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter and Instagram
https://twitter.com/rosannewelchhttp://instagram.com/drrosannewelch

 

Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch teaches the History of Screenwriting and One-Hour Drama for the Stephens College MFA in Screenwriting.

Writing/producing credits include Beverly Hills 90210, Picket Fences, ABCNEWS: Nightline and Touched by an Angel. In 2016 she published the book Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop; co-edited Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia; and placed “Transmitting Culture Transnationally Via the Characterization of Parents in Police Procedurals” in the New Review of Film and Television Studies. Essays appear in Torchwood Declassified: Investigating Mainstream Cult Television and Doctor Who and Race: An Anthology. Welch serves as Book Reviews editor for Journal of Screenwriting and on the Editorial Advisory Board for Written By magazine, the magazine of the Writers Guild.

Watch Dr. Welch’s talk “The Importance of Having a Female Voice in the Room” at the 2016 TEDxCPP.

Quote from “America’s Forgotten Founding Father” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 8 in a series – To The Coast…and, maybe, America!

Quote from

Livorno? The coast? Could he go that far? Filippo remembered all the days of sitting with his tutor dreaming of going even farther, even to the American colonies. How odd that they suddenly popped into his head again. How better to begin a life’s journey across the ocean than by living near one for a while?

 From America’s Forgotten Founding Father — Get Your Copy Today!


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Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 97 in a series – Tork and Nesmith and Acting

** Buy “Why The Monkees Matter” Today **

Quotes from

Neither Tork nor Nesmith cared much for acting once the show was over, appearing in only a handful of television programs. Tork shunned acting for years, so his appearances were nil until the nineties with Boy Meets World and Seventh Heaven. Nesmith stayed behind the cameras except for hosting the shows he produced, Elephant Parts and Television Parts (directed by Dolenz) in the early 80s.

from Why The Monkees Matter by Dr. Rosanne Welch —  Buy your Copy today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

    

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17 When Women Write Gidget from How Gidget Got Into the Girl Ghetto with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (0:54)

17 When Women Write Gidget from How Gidget Got Into the Girl Ghetto with Dr. Rosanne Welch

17 When Women Write Gidget from How Gidget Got Into the Girl Ghetto with Dr. Rosanne Welch

Watch this entire presentation

 

Transcript:

If we flip back to Flippen, and now she’s taking her friend seriously. This friend, Larue, is being bullied at school so talk about an interesting theme that is still very prevalent right? And it’s her friend Gidget who stands by her and doesn’t care what the other girls think. “You’re still my friend.” It’s because Larue likes to ride horses more than she wants to get a boyfriend and the girls don’t respect her for that. So again, a girl interested in a sport that she wants to be better at. That’s the kind of friend Gidget wants to have, not a friend who goes shopping and kisses boys all the time. So she takes care of her friend, the Dad helps out, which I think is really pretty, and in the end, again, we go back to, “As long as a girl’s got something to love, all’s right with the world and it can be an ocean, a horse, a friend of just incidentally, a boy.” Men are not the most important catch in her life. I think that’s really cool. Written by a woman in a TV show.

At this year’s 10th Annual Screenwriting Research Network Conference at Otago University in Dunedin, New Zealand I presented…

“How Gidget Got Into the Girl Ghetto by Accident (and How We Can Get Her Out of it): Demoting Gidget: The Little Girl with Big Ideas from Edgy Coming of Age Novel to Babe on the Beach Genre Film via Choices made in the Adaptation Process.”

It’ a long title, as I joke up front, but covers the process of adapting the true life story of Kathy Kohner (nicknamed ‘Gidget’ by the group of male surfers who she spent the summers with in Malibu in the 1950s) into the film and television series that are better remembered than the novel. The novel had been well-received upon publication, even compared to A Catcher in the Rye, but has mistakenly been relegated to the ‘girl ghetto’ of films. Some of the adaptations turned the focus away from the coming of age story of a young woman who gained respect for her talent at a male craft – surfing – and instead turned the focus far too much on Kathy being boy crazy.

Along the way I found interesting comparisons between how female writers treated the main character while adapting the novel and how male writers treated the character.

Gidget


Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch teaches the History of Screenwriting and One-Hour Drama for the Stephens College MFA in Screenwriting.

Writing/producing credits include Beverly Hills 90210, Picket Fences, ABCNEWS: Nightline and Touched by an Angel. In 2016 she published the book Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop; co-edited Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia; and placed “Transmitting Culture Transnationally Via the Characterization of Parents in Police Procedurals” in the New Review of Film and Television Studies. Essays appear in Torchwood Declassified: Investigating Mainstream Cult Television and Doctor Who and Race: An Anthology. Welch serves as Book Reviews editor for Journal of Screenwriting and on the Editorial Advisory Board for Written By magazine, the magazine of the Writers Guild.

Watch Dr. Welch’s talk “The Importance of Having a Female Voice in the Room” at the 2016 TEDxCPP.


SRN logo red

The Screenwriting Research Network is a research group consisting of scholars, reflective practitioners and practice-based researchers interested in research on screenwriting. The aim is to rethink the screenplay in relation to its histories, theories, values and creative practices.

Quote from “America’s Forgotten Founding Father” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 7 in a series – Given Your Love to the Wrong Son

Quote from

Then he turned to his mother sadly. “Good-bye, mother. May God reward you as you deserve for your behavior toward me. If you will not listen to me, if you will not see the error of these choices, I will spend the rest of my life proving you have given all your love to the wrong son.”

 From America’s Forgotten Founding Father — Get Your Copy Today!


Join the Rosanne Welch Mailing List for future book and event announcements!
 

Print Edition | Kindle Edition | Apple iBooks Edition | Nook Edition

Presenting on my book, America’s Forgotten Founding Father via My Instagram

Presenting on my book, America’s Forgotten Founding Father via My Instagram
Presenting on my book, America’s Forgotten Founding Father

Cal Poly Pomona Golden Leaves presentations at Cal Poly Pomona University Library. 

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Join the Rosanne Welch Mailing List for future book and event announcements!
 

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07 Terry Nation, Doctor Who and MacGyver from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse [Video] (0:50)

Watch this entire presentation: Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse: Paving the Way for a Lady Doctor with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video] (36:58)

07 Terry Nation, Doctor Who and MacGyver from Gender Diversity in the Who-niverse

For her 5th Doctor Who lecture to the CPP community, Dr. Rosanne Welch discusses how society – and the show’s writing staff – prepared the audience for a major change in this 50-year franchise – the creation of the first Lady Doctor!

Transcript:

Later in the era of Doctor Who we get Terry Nation and Terry Nation is a really cool writer. He invented the Daleks. So without him, we wouldn’t have the world’s coolest villains, right? We wouldn’t be able to “Exterminate” any time we wanted. So I think that’s really cool, but what’s excellently interesting to me about Terry Nation as a writer is that he also invented this character, Sara Kingdom and she’s a secret agent who changes sides to work with the Doctor. She’s a bad girl who uses her badness to help the good guy. So that was a concoction of Terry Nation’s in the early days of the show and then you’re asking yourself “why is this old picture of MacGyver up there?” How did this one thing affect another, exactly? Terry Nation came from England and over to the states to work in America in television and he helped create MacGyver.

Follow Dr. Welch on Twitter and Instagram
https://twitter.com/rosannewelchhttp://instagram.com/drrosannewelch

 

Dr. Rosanne Welch

Dr. Rosanne Welch teaches the History of Screenwriting and One-Hour Drama for the Stephens College MFA in Screenwriting.

Writing/producing credits include Beverly Hills 90210, Picket Fences, ABCNEWS: Nightline and Touched by an Angel. In 2016 she published the book Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop; co-edited Women in American History: A Social, Political, and Cultural Encyclopedia; and placed “Transmitting Culture Transnationally Via the Characterization of Parents in Police Procedurals” in the New Review of Film and Television Studies. Essays appear in Torchwood Declassified: Investigating Mainstream Cult Television and Doctor Who and Race: An Anthology. Welch serves as Book Reviews editor for Journal of Screenwriting and on the Editorial Advisory Board for Written By magazine, the magazine of the Writers Guild.

Watch Dr. Welch’s talk “The Importance of Having a Female Voice in the Room” at the 2016 TEDxCPP.

Quotes from “Why The Monkees Matter” by Dr. Rosanne Welch – 96 in a series – Laugh-In

** Buy “Why The Monkees Matter” Today **

Quotes from

The Monkees also influenced the existence and success of Rowan and Martin’s Laugh-In first because the comedy variety show hosted by Dan Rowan and Dick Martin premiered after a first run episode of The Monkees, thereby providing the young audience the new show needed to be considered hip. 

from Why The Monkees Matter by Dr. Rosanne Welch —  Buy your Copy today!

 Why The Monkees Matter: Teenagers, Television and American Pop Culture

    

McFarland (Direct from Publisher) | Amazon | Kindle Edition | Nook Edition

 Myself and Peg Lamphier (in background) at Cal Poly Pomona Golden Leaves presentations via My Instagram

 Myself and Peg Lamphier (in background) at Cal Poly Pomona Golden Leaves presentations via My Instagram

 Myself and Peg Lamphier (in background) at Cal Poly Pomona Golden Leaves presentations at Cal Poly Pomona University Library. 

 

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