I (@douglaswelch) grabbed a photo of Rosanne at M Street Coffee while we enjoyed our iced lattes. A short break between errands today via Instagram [Photography]

I (@douglaswelch) grabbed a photo of Rosanne at M Street Coffee while we enjoyed our iced lattes. A short break between errands today via Instagram [Photography]

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29 From Idea to Execution from The Difficulties and Delicacies of Writing the First Female Doctor in 50+ years [Video] [Doctor Who]

It was great to be able to attend this year’s SD WhoCon in San Diego and present this lecture on “The Difficulties and Delicacies of Writing the First Female Doctor in 50+ years” in which I discuss how successful I think showrunner Christopher Chibnall was in making that transition.

It gave me a chance to talk about the creative work of a showrunner/screenwriter while also reconnecting to some friends we had met at this same convention some 3 years ago – and to talk about one of my favorite subjects – Doctor Who!

I recently presented a talk on Torchwood (Why Torchwood Still Matters) where I highlighted a few ways in which the show (airing from 2006 to 2011) came up with progressive and innovative ideas that are being used by other franchises today. 

I always enjoy attending the SD (San Diego) WhoCon because the audiences are so well-informed on the Whoniverse and Whovians love Captain Jack and the crew that made this spinoff program so engaging.

RMW Rosanne Signature for Web

29 From Idea to Execution from Why Torchwood Still Matters (2021) with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video]

 

Transcript:

Now I think it’s really important to think about how then the writer/showrunner has to decide which of these episodes will be mine and what do I want to say with mine and even when it’s not mine, I’m going to do the final rewrite. I’m going to do the polish to make sure it sounds like all these episodes are coming from one voice, right, which is really why all of Russell’s stuff sounds like Russell. In fact, anyone here ever read “The Writer’s Tale” which is his book –– oh my gosh i should have brought a copy of it. It’s really thick. A journalist named Benjamin Cook asked him in the last season of the David Tennant era “Could I email you and ask you questions about where you’re at with your stories and then we’ll publish a book out of it” and Russell was like sure whatever. So what you get are things like, okay so what are you thinking about tonight and Russell will go “I don’t know. It just occurred to me what if water was like acid and could kill you? Can I play with that?” and a few pages later it’s like “You know what? I’m trying to do an episode on Mars. What if martian water is actually what could kill you before you know it you get to he’s writing “Waters of Mars.” So you literally watch from the idea through the execution of the story.

 

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20 Lower 10%, Classism, and Death from Why Torchwood Still Matters (2021) with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video]

I recently presented a talk on Torchwood (Why Torchwood Still Matters) where I highlighted a few ways in which the show (airing from 2006 to 2011) came up with progressive and innovative ideas that are being used by other franchises today. 

I always enjoy attending the SD (San Diego) WhoCon because the audiences are so well-informed on the Whoniverse and Whovians love Captain Jack and the crew that made this spinoff program so engaging.

RMW Rosanne Signature for Web

20 Lower 10%, Classism, and Death from Why Torchwood Still Matters (2021) with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video]

Transcript:

My favorite line in all of “Children of Earth” is “What are the school tables for? and you’re like “Oh my god. Like we do rank people all the time.” Here would be a perfect chance to say, Sorry you didn’t get your SAT score. Bye-bye. I just – yeah it was very it was chilling how real it felt for being obviously such a surreal and not real instance and also the line when all the leaders around the table and the woman says “Well certainly none of the children that belong to anyone here but wait I don’t have children but I have nieces and nephews. What about them? and suddenly you start seeing what little deals are we gonna have to play. Yeah, I think it was chilling. So I think that bingeability that was a big thing you brought to it. Now I’ve said before not a fan of “Miracle Day.” Largely because I think he didn’t check the idea that never dying isn’t inherently a problem. I mean they tried to make it a problem because yeah too many people on the earth will be a problem but actually like isn’t that what everybody wants? Nobody wants to die. So it seemed odd that like we were supposed to not like it. I don’t know it didn’t seem to me he thought his way through.

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10 Women Writing Westerns from What Is a Western? Interview Series: When Women Wrote Westerns from the Autry Museum of the American West [Video]

10 Women Writing Westerns from What Is a Western? Interview Series: When Women Wrote Westerns from the Autry Museum of the American West [Video]

Transcript:

Host: When you look at all of the histories and biographies that you learned about of women screenwriters are there a couple in particular that you wish more people knew? Maybe these are some of the ones you’ve mentioned already, but are there a couple that you just want to sort of shout from the rooftops? This is a classic. This is a person who should be on the marquee.

Rosanne: Oh, yeah. Well, obviously I did mention Frances Marion. She wrote a series of westerns for her husband, Fred Thomson, who was a western star, right? He was right up there rivaling William S. Hart moving into the talkie world. The problem is he died young and when he died she lost her interest in writing westerns because, of course, it was too reminiscent of him. They were right up there with Pickford and Fairbanks except they were a writer/actor team. So I think that Frances Marion is someone who people have to look more into. I love Jeannie MacPherson and she wrote several westerns. Always about a woman going out west and having experiences and surviving the West. Which is really a western story. A lone person – doesn’t have to be a boy or a girl – a long person challenges themselves and succeeds. So I think she is a really big name.

 

The Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting is building a relationship with the Autry Museum of the American West since both organizations are devoted to bringing out more diverse and untold stories.  Last year we were able to take our cohort of graduating MFA candidates to the museum’s theatre for a showing of Michael Wilson’s Salt of the Earth and we had plans to present a film of our choice this year – but of course the pandemic changed all that.  Instead, Autry Curator Josh Garrett-Davis asked me if I would sit for an interview about female screenwriters in the western genre and so “When Women Wrote Westerns” came to be a part of their “What Is a Western? Interview Series”

I had a great time discussing so many wonderful women writers – from Jeanne MacPherson to D.C. Fontana to Edna Ferber to Emily Andras.  If you love westerns I suggest you watch Josh’s other interviews covering everything from the work of Native Americans in Western movies to films in the western-horror hybrid. — RMW Rosanne Signature for Web


What this entire presentation

As part of a series exploring the significance of the Western genre and the ways in which the movies shape our understanding of the American West, Autry Curator Josh Garrett-Davis interviews Professor Rosanne Welch about the women screenwriters of Hollywood and their contributions to the Western genre.

Find more information at the Autry Museum of the American West

25 My Screenwriting Story from In Conversation with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video]

25 My Screenwriting Story from In Conversation with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video]

Transcript:

Host: Speaking of screenwriting technique, I feel I should ask you to tell us a little bit more about your career as a practicing screenwriter. Yeah, what have you been working what what what have you worked on, and are you working on anything at the moment?

Rosanne: Yes I come out of the world of –  I came out in LA from Cleveland. I was a kid from Cleveland and I moved out here for the purpose of working in television and had to do the whole – I was an English teacher – high school – that was my out of college job and luckily I got hired on as a writer’s assistant because I could spell, which was the funny joke like I could clean up their spelling which I thought was funny. So I was an assistant for probably about five years and everyone and when I tell students that they sort of cringe because they think they’re going to get the job and then they’ll get hired as a writer and they have to say you know it’s about networking. It’s about meeting people and then meeting people who like the things you’ve written. You have to write a lot of spec scripts and keep showing them to people who are willing to read them. They have to decide the stuff is good enough and then they’ll offer you a freelance script. That’s one season. You’re still the assistant while you’re doing that and then if they think it’s good enough and the show doesn’t get canceled they’ll offer you, perhaps, a staff –  you know it’s all so much of that as part of it. I would get offered scripts on shows for the second season and it would cancel at the end of the first season. So not only are you scrambling for a job to pay the rent but you now lost that hope and so you’re in a new place with new people. You convince them you’re pretty good. They give you a freelance on their show and the next season they’re canceled.

One of the benefits of attending conferences is that you can meet the editors from the companies that have published some of your books face to face. That happened at the recent SCMS conference where I met Intellect editor James Campbell and he invited me to be a guest on his InstagramLive show.

We chatted about my work with the Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting, and then my work with co-editor Rose Ferrell on the Journal of Screenwriting’s special issue on Women in Screenwriting (Volume 11, Number 3) that came out recently and which featured articles about an international set of female screenwriters from Syria, Argentina, China and Canada (to name a few).

We even had time to nerd out on our own favorite classic films across the eras which brought up fun memories of Angels with Dirty Faces, Back to the Future, Bonnie and Clyde, and of course, all things Star Wars from the original 3 to The Mandalorian. It’s always so fun to talk to fellow cinephiles.

RMW Rosanne Signature for Web

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With Intellect Books Editor James Campbell (@IntellectBooks)

Speaking with Dr. Rosanne Welch, Author, teacher, and television screenwriter. Today we cover everything from women in screenwriting to our favorite Jimmy Cagney movies and Friends.

Journal of Screenwriting Cover

From Ireland To Palestine Gene Gauntier Invented Location Filming – Dr. Rosanne Welch, Script Magazine, August 2022

From Ireland To Palestine Gene Gauntier Invented Location Filming – Dr. Rosanne Welch, Script Magazine, August 2022

As with many women in early Hollywood, Gene Gauntier entered the business as an actress. Born Genevieve G. Liggett in Texas sometime in the 1880s, Gauntier had graduated from the Kansas City Academy of Elocution and Oratory. After a couple of years on the New York stage, she auditioned for director Sidney Olcott at the Biograph Studios in 1906. She saw that in the script her character appeared to drown and though Gauntier did not know how to swim, she took the job anyway. On that adventuresome spirit, she built a career in which she served as a writer, producer, director, and production company owner. She also instituted rules that covered adaptations for years.

Read From Ireland To Palestine Gene Gauntier Invented Location Filming


Read about more women from early Hollywood

 

28 The Homage from The Difficulties and Delicacies of Writing the First Female Doctor in 50+ years [Video] [Doctor Who]

It was great to be able to attend this year’s SD WhoCon in San Diego and present this lecture on “The Difficulties and Delicacies of Writing the First Female Doctor in 50+ years” in which I discuss how successful I think showrunner Christopher Chibnall was in making that transition.

It gave me a chance to talk about the creative work of a showrunner/screenwriter while also reconnecting to some friends we had met at this same convention some 3 years ago – and to talk about one of my favorite subjects – Doctor Who!

28 The Homage from The Difficulties and Delicacies of Writing the First Female Doctor in 50+ years [Video] [Doctor Who]

Transcript:

Now this homage business reminds me when I teach film history, we do this in movies all the time. Forget just remaking a movie. All you do is you take a storyline and you flip the genders and you have a new movie, right? So if you know “It Happened One Night”, it’s one of the first movie ever to win all five of the major Oscars. A very big deal. Robert Riskin wrote it. It’s the story of a –– Clark Gable is a reporter who’s following an heiress who’s run away on the eve of her wedding and of course, they fall in love on their little journey and by the time they get home they’re going to get married. If you move to the 70s and “The Electric Horseman”, Robert Redford is a rodeo star who’s become a celebrity. Jane Fonda is the reporter. He’s run away with a major expensive horse because they’re gonna like put the horse down and do something and then she follows him to get a story but they fall in love. So it’s exactly the same story. Just flip the genders right? So movies are always ––  I mean writers always do this. We’re homaging something we loved by givingit a little flip. So I think that “Father’s Day” and “Demons the Punjab” fall into that.

 

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Brunch at Fika Fika, Pasadena before podcast recording. Yum! (2 Photos) via Instagram [Photography]

Brunch at Fika Fika, Pasadena before podcast recording. Yum! (2 Photos) via Instagram [Photography]

Brunch at Fika Fika, Pasadena before podcast recording. Yum! (2 Photos) via Instagram [Photography]

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19 Ableism and Children of Earth from Why Torchwood Still Matters (2021) with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video]

I recently presented a talk on Torchwood (Why Torchwood Still Matters) where I highlighted a few ways in which the show (airing from 2006 to 2011) came up with progressive and innovative ideas that are being used by other franchises today. 

I always enjoy attending the SD (San Diego) WhoCon because the audiences are so well-informed on the Whoniverse and Whovians love Captain Jack and the crew that made this spinoff program so engaging.

RMW Rosanne Signature for Web

19 Ableism and Children of Earth from Why Torchwood Still Matters (2021) with Dr. Rosanne Welch [Video]

Transcript:

Audience: For a lot of people, where something doesn’t affect them, they kind of like push them under the rug. You’re like we’re not gonna but like the way that they talked about the ableism from that situation I thought was really interesting because like you wouldn’t expect a team of people that are in power to kind of like think about that but it just made it like so much more realistic because like everyone watching would know exactly what ten percent would be sacrificed. Like everyone knows but they had the guts to say it which I thought was really interesting.

Rosanne: Russell does that. That’s what’s so amazing to me about his writing. I really love his writing. I’m looking forward to him coming back to Who. I’m looking forward to you know all the future stuff he does. “It’s a Sin” just ended and that was you know quite good. Most of my students were very excited about that

Audience: Did you see “Years and Years?”

Rosanne: I saw the pilot and it was so hard I – it’s in my queue. I have to take my time to watch it. So I know it was but it was so hard to ––

It was scared me too much which is really interesting and I knew that meant he was gonna go deeper and I have to be like in a mood to quietly sit and soak that in so I don’t run through it and get scared.

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09 More On Women Writing Westerns For TV from What Is a Western? Interview Series: When Women Wrote Westerns from the Autry Museum of the American West [Video]

09 More On Women Writing Westerns For TV from What Is a Western? Interview Series: When Women Wrote Westerns from the Autry Museum of the American West [Video]

Transcript:

…but so these women have moved into tv they start doing these other sorts of westerns and then of course Leigh Brackett moves back into movies when she writes “The Empire Strikes Back” but also think about the era of tv as it expands and grows they’re done telling the same repetitive stories. So then we’re going to get Beth Sullivan and “Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman”, right which takes the West from that female perspective and is based in real life on a couple of women who couldn’t be doctors in the East, right, but it’s still Western. We got horses. We got cute guys and you know outlaw outfits. It’s a western. It’s just a female experience. So they see much more opportunity there and then slowly maybe they’re appealing back in the movies when it comes to westerns but not as much as we’d like.

 

The Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting is building a relationship with the Autry Museum of the American West since both organizations are devoted to bringing out more diverse and untold stories.  Last year we were able to take our cohort of graduating MFA candidates to the museum’s theatre for a showing of Michael Wilson’s Salt of the Earth and we had plans to present a film of our choice this year – but of course the pandemic changed all that.  Instead, Autry Curator Josh Garrett-Davis asked me if I would sit for an interview about female screenwriters in the western genre and so “When Women Wrote Westerns” came to be a part of their “What Is a Western? Interview Series”

I had a great time discussing so many wonderful women writers – from Jeanne MacPherson to D.C. Fontana to Edna Ferber to Emily Andras.  If you love westerns I suggest you watch Josh’s other interviews covering everything from the work of Native Americans in Western movies to films in the western-horror hybrid. — RMW Rosanne Signature for Web


What this entire presentation

As part of a series exploring the significance of the Western genre and the ways in which the movies shape our understanding of the American West, Autry Curator Josh Garrett-Davis interviews Professor Rosanne Welch about the women screenwriters of Hollywood and their contributions to the Western genre.

Find more information at the Autry Museum of the American West