37 International TV Shows and the US from Why Researching Screenwriters Has Always Mattered [Video] (41 seconds)

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37 International TV Shows and the US from Why Researching Screenwriters Has Always Mattered [Video] (41 seconds)

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Transcript:

This is a film — excuse me — a tv show that started in Europe. I learned about it through an Italian screenwriting colleague — Braccialetti Rossi and it’s about a group of young children in a hospital and they wear red bands because they have terminal illnesses and it’s about them banding together and being friends, One of the things that’s good or maybe bad about what’s going on with international television is that I believe we could air the original version in the United States and that enough people would watch it but the networks still believe they need to have an American version — a United States version. I had to learn to stop saying that this week right because I’m in America right now.

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A Note About This Presentation

A clip from my keynote speech at the 10th Screenwriters´(hi)Stories Seminar for the interdisciplinary Graduation Program in “Education, Art, and History of Culture”, in Mackenzie Presbyterian University, at São Paulo, SP, Brazil, focused on the topic “Why Researching Screenwriters (has Always) Mattered.” I was especially pleased with the passion these young scholars have toward screenwriting and it’s importance in transmitting culture across the man-made borders of our world.

To understand the world we have to understand its stories and to understand the world’s stories we must understand the world’s storytellers. A century ago and longer those people would have been the novelists of any particular country but since the invention of film, the storytellers who reach the most people with their ideas and their lessons have been the screenwriters. My teaching philosophy is that: Words matter, Writers matter, and Women writers matte, r so women writers are my focus because they have been the far less researched and yet they are over half the population. We cannot tell the stories of the people until we know what stories the mothers have passed down to their children. Those are the stories that last. Now is the time to research screenwriters of all cultures and the stories they tell because people are finally recognizing the work of writers and appreciating how their favorite stories took shape on the page long before they were cast, or filmed, or edited. But also because streaming services make the stories of many cultures now available to a much wider world than ever before.

Many thanks to Glaucia Davino for the invitation.


 

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

36 Streaming Companies and World Culture from Why Researching Screenwriters Has Always Mattered [Video] (1 minute 19 seconds)

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36 Streaming Companies and World Culture from Why Researching Screenwriters Has Always Mattered [Video] (1 minute 19 seconds)

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Transcript:

That’s why these services are so important to what we’re going to be able to do in the future because so many films are now co-productions with Netflix and they know they want to keep this worldwide audience because soon we’ll have the Disney streaming channel and we’re going to have an NBC streaming channel. There will be too many of those to pick from. The one thing Netflix has going for it is it’s done co-productions with so many countries. So people can have an interest in seeing their stories more than repetitive Disney stories, as much as I like Disney after a while I don’t need to see Aladdin filmed by 47 different actors again and again and again. So I think it’s really important and so even when I was preparing and thinking about doing this I watched some Brazilian television. I was able on my own television to simply dial up these programs and see what they were all about and because of that, I can then share them with my students who are very interested in finding out because my students come from many, many different backgrounds — many many different heritages and they don’t always see themselves represented on film. So the idea of seeing television shows and movies from their families home culture is a beautiful way for them to keep that culture even in a world where assimilation is the thing that more people are respecting, and they feel they lose their culture.

Watch this entire presentation

A Note About This Presentation

A clip from my keynote speech at the 10th Screenwriters´(hi)Stories Seminar for the interdisciplinary Graduation Program in “Education, Art, and History of Culture”, in Mackenzie Presbyterian University, at São Paulo, SP, Brazil, focused on the topic “Why Researching Screenwriters (has Always) Mattered.” I was especially pleased with the passion these young scholars have toward screenwriting and it’s importance in transmitting culture across the man-made borders of our world.

To understand the world we have to understand its stories and to understand the world’s stories we must understand the world’s storytellers. A century ago and longer those people would have been the novelists of any particular country but since the invention of film, the storytellers who reach the most people with their ideas and their lessons have been the screenwriters. My teaching philosophy is that: Words matter, Writers matter, and Women writers matte, r so women writers are my focus because they have been the far less researched and yet they are over half the population. We cannot tell the stories of the people until we know what stories the mothers have passed down to their children. Those are the stories that last. Now is the time to research screenwriters of all cultures and the stories they tell because people are finally recognizing the work of writers and appreciating how their favorite stories took shape on the page long before they were cast, or filmed, or edited. But also because streaming services make the stories of many cultures now available to a much wider world than ever before.

Many thanks to Glaucia Davino for the invitation.


 

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

35 Subtitles Are No Longer Scary from Why Researching Screenwriters Has Always Mattered [Video] (1 minute 5 seconds)

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35 Subtitles Are No Longer Scary from Why Researching Screenwriters Has Always Mattered [Video] (1 minute 5 seconds)

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Transcript:

Previously in the United States, the only way we could see a movie from Brazil would be if it won an Oscar or if it was nominated for an Oscar right and these are the only films that had wide release in the United States before Netflix because you would have to go to a theater. You would have to be the kind of person who liked to see international films, who were willing to read subtitles. I noticed — my son is 21 — and I notice in his generation there is more of a comfort with reading subtitles. He watches, because of Netflix, a lot of Japanese anime — a lot of movies from around the world — he doesn’t mind. About 10 years ago, before Netflix. if I assigned an international movie — and I would often assign some Italian films to my film students — they would complain because reading the screen was boring. Now it’s become more acceptable so that we have this opportunity. So until Netflix, this was the only way that in the United States we would have been exposed to any of these films except Kiss of the Spider Woman because that was a co-production between Brazil and the United States so it won some Oscars and we knew about it.

Watch this entire presentation

A Note About This Presentation

A clip from my keynote speech at the 10th Screenwriters´(hi)Stories Seminar for the interdisciplinary Graduation Program in “Education, Art, and History of Culture”, in Mackenzie Presbyterian University, at São Paulo, SP, Brazil, focused on the topic “Why Researching Screenwriters (has Always) Mattered.” I was especially pleased with the passion these young scholars have toward screenwriting and it’s importance in transmitting culture across the man-made borders of our world.

To understand the world we have to understand its stories and to understand the world’s stories we must understand the world’s storytellers. A century ago and longer those people would have been the novelists of any particular country but since the invention of film, the storytellers who reach the most people with their ideas and their lessons have been the screenwriters. My teaching philosophy is that: Words matter, Writers matter, and Women writers matte, r so women writers are my focus because they have been the far less researched and yet they are over half the population. We cannot tell the stories of the people until we know what stories the mothers have passed down to their children. Those are the stories that last. Now is the time to research screenwriters of all cultures and the stories they tell because people are finally recognizing the work of writers and appreciating how their favorite stories took shape on the page long before they were cast, or filmed, or edited. But also because streaming services make the stories of many cultures now available to a much wider world than ever before.

Many thanks to Glaucia Davino for the invitation.


 

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

34 Coco and Exposure To Different Cultures from Why Researching Screenwriters Has Always Mattered [Video] (2 mins)

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34 Coco and Exposure To Different Cultures from Why Researching Screenwriters Has Always Mattered [Video] (2 mins)

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Transcript:

One of my favorite examples of how important it is to see culture travel through these streaming services is the film — it’s called Coco in the United States. It’s called Vivo here. When my cousins — my cousins are from Sicily — my grandparents immigrated to the United States from Sicily and their relatives stayed behind. So I’m related and connected to third and fourth cousins who live there. They came to visit me at Christmas this year and we were discussing Halloween, which I laughed at because I noticed some Halloween decorations in places I traveled around town today, and my cousin said in Italy Halloween is not very important because of course being a Catholic country what is important is that this is the Day of All Souls and so it’s a religious holiday. Only in you know only in Italy is that important and I said oh haven’t you ever heard of the Day of the Dead in Mexico and she had not because in Italy they haven’t studied Mexican culture. So I mentioned this movie which she had never seen but her 10-year-old son had seen it. The problem was on Netflix it was only running in English or Spanish and they’re Italian but their 10-year-old is studying Spanish in school. So at my house, we turned on Netflix. We watched the movie in Spanish with English subtitles to remind me because I’d seen it but I wanted to remember the story and any time the Italians lost track of this Spanish language we would pause and the ten-year-old would translate the Spanish into Italian and we’d all catch up and continue and in that way, they learned the story of the Day of the Dead — Dia de Los Muertos through this movie and they were so moved by the theme of the movie which again is such a universal theme that we should honor our ancestors and that we owe it to them right to live up to their history. It was a beautiful example of what Netflix is capable of doing — what streaming services are capable of doing for us and how important story is.

Watch this entire presentation

A Note About This Presentation

A clip from my keynote speech at the 10th Screenwriters´(hi)Stories Seminar for the interdisciplinary Graduation Program in “Education, Art, and History of Culture”, in Mackenzie Presbyterian University, at São Paulo, SP, Brazil, focused on the topic “Why Researching Screenwriters (has Always) Mattered.” I was especially pleased with the passion these young scholars have toward screenwriting and it’s importance in transmitting culture across the man-made borders of our world.

To understand the world we have to understand its stories and to understand the world’s stories we must understand the world’s storytellers. A century ago and longer those people would have been the novelists of any particular country but since the invention of film, the storytellers who reach the most people with their ideas and their lessons have been the screenwriters. My teaching philosophy is that: Words matter, Writers matter, and Women writers matte, r so women writers are my focus because they have been the far less researched and yet they are over half the population. We cannot tell the stories of the people until we know what stories the mothers have passed down to their children. Those are the stories that last. Now is the time to research screenwriters of all cultures and the stories they tell because people are finally recognizing the work of writers and appreciating how their favorite stories took shape on the page long before they were cast, or filmed, or edited. But also because streaming services make the stories of many cultures now available to a much wider world than ever before.

Many thanks to Glaucia Davino for the invitation.


 

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Reel Sisters Virtual Film Festival and Lecture Series 2020 – Dr. Rosanne Welch and Dawn Comer Jefferson Analyze The Script, Joe & The Shawl [Video] (1 hour 42 minutes)

As one of the sponsors of the Reel Sisters of the Diaspora Film Festival the Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting was pleased to host a live panel at their 2020 virtual film festival discussing the 10 minute short Joe and the Shawl

Described as the story of “an adorable tow truck driver who really digs Kelli, a fellow North Carolinian, when he meets her as he changes her dead car battery. But Joe’s interest takes a sharp right turn when he learns that Kelli is a Muslim” the film raised questions of identity, representation and religious freedom.

For the panel, Executive Director Rosanne Welch and mentor/instructor Dawn Comer Jefferson provided a breakdown of the script followed by moderating questions from the audience. Guests included Nicole Ballivian (writer-director), Deonna Kelli Sayed, from whose blog post the script was adapted, and actors Jill Galbraith and Travis Lincoln Cox. — Rosanne

Reel Sisters & Stephens College Host Script Analysis for Joe & The Shawl from African Voices/Reel Sisters on Vimeo.



Reel Sisters Virtual Film Festival and Lecture Series 2020 - Dr. Rosanne Welch and Dawn Comer Jefferson Analyze The Script, Joe & The Shawl [Video] (1 hour 42 minutes)

33 The First Six Years from Why Researching Screenwriters Has Always Mattered [Video] (49 seconds)

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33 The First Six Years from Why Researching Screenwriters Has Always Mattered [Video] (49 seconds)

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Transcript:

I read once that Tennessee Williams, who’s a famous playwright in the United States, had said that most writers work from the emotions of the first six years of their life and some people laughed at that and I laughed at that and then I realized that in many episodes that I had written, a recurring theme that I tend to go to is that — to be a father is the most important job in your life and you should take it seriously. My father left when I was six years old. Until looking backward at things that I had written I did not notice the repetition of that theme. Clearly, it means something to me. Everybody doesn’t have that experience but everybody has been abandoned in some way or another. We recognize that emotion of loss and that’s what we sell

Watch this entire presentation

A Note About This Presentation

A clip from my keynote speech at the 10th Screenwriters´(hi)Stories Seminar for the interdisciplinary Graduation Program in “Education, Art, and History of Culture”, in Mackenzie Presbyterian University, at São Paulo, SP, Brazil, focused on the topic “Why Researching Screenwriters (has Always) Mattered.” I was especially pleased with the passion these young scholars have toward screenwriting and it’s importance in transmitting culture across the man-made borders of our world.

To understand the world we have to understand its stories and to understand the world’s stories we must understand the world’s storytellers. A century ago and longer those people would have been the novelists of any particular country but since the invention of film, the storytellers who reach the most people with their ideas and their lessons have been the screenwriters. My teaching philosophy is that: Words matter, Writers matter, and Women writers matte, r so women writers are my focus because they have been the far less researched and yet they are over half the population. We cannot tell the stories of the people until we know what stories the mothers have passed down to their children. Those are the stories that last. Now is the time to research screenwriters of all cultures and the stories they tell because people are finally recognizing the work of writers and appreciating how their favorite stories took shape on the page long before they were cast, or filmed, or edited. But also because streaming services make the stories of many cultures now available to a much wider world than ever before.

Many thanks to Glaucia Davino for the invitation.


 

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

32 You Should Write What (Emotions) You Know from Why Researching Screenwriters Has Always Mattered [Video] (28 seconds)

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32 You Should Write What (Emotions) You Know from Why Researching Screenwriters Has Always Mattered

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Transcript:

When I teach my students about writing, there’s the quote “you should write what you know” and sometimes people think that means if you come from a family where your father’s a policeman you should write about policemen. If you yourself were a high school teacher you should write about teachers. It doesn’t mean, to me, you should write your experiences only. It means you should write the emotions that you know because the emotions are what are universal and that’s what sells to other people.

Watch this entire presentation

A Note About This Presentation

A clip from my keynote speech at the 10th Screenwriters´(hi)Stories Seminar for the interdisciplinary Graduation Program in “Education, Art, and History of Culture”, in Mackenzie Presbyterian University, at São Paulo, SP, Brazil, focused on the topic “Why Researching Screenwriters (has Always) Mattered.” I was especially pleased with the passion these young scholars have toward screenwriting and it’s importance in transmitting culture across the man-made borders of our world.

To understand the world we have to understand its stories and to understand the world’s stories we must understand the world’s storytellers. A century ago and longer those people would have been the novelists of any particular country but since the invention of film, the storytellers who reach the most people with their ideas and their lessons have been the screenwriters. My teaching philosophy is that: Words matter, Writers matter, and Women writers matte, r so women writers are my focus because they have been the far less researched and yet they are over half the population. We cannot tell the stories of the people until we know what stories the mothers have passed down to their children. Those are the stories that last. Now is the time to research screenwriters of all cultures and the stories they tell because people are finally recognizing the work of writers and appreciating how their favorite stories took shape on the page long before they were cast, or filmed, or edited. But also because streaming services make the stories of many cultures now available to a much wider world than ever before.

Many thanks to Glaucia Davino for the invitation.


 

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Reel Sisters of the Diaspora Film Festival Script Breakdown Session with Dr. Rosanne Welch and Dawn Comer Jefferson – Sunday, October 25, 2020

Reel Sisters of the Diaspora Film Festival Script Breakdown Session with Dr. Rosanne Welch and Dawn Comer Jefferson - Sunday, October 25, 2020

As the Stephens College MFA in TV and Screenwriting is one of the sponsors of the Reel Sisters of the Diaspora Film Festival I’ll be hosting (along with MFA mentor Dawn Comer Jefferson) a free script breakdown and Q & A with Nicole Ballivian (writer-director) for her 10 minute short Joe and the Shawl described as the story of “an adorable tow truck driver who really digs Kelli, a fellow North Carolinian, when he meets her as he changes her dead car battery. But Joe’s interest takes a sharp right turn when he learns that Kelli is a Muslim.”

If you’d like to virtually attend the event, register and join us

Sunday, October 25th
1pm-2:30pm (Pacific Time)
FREE
Register Here

For more information on the Joe and the Shawl, check out the film’s website

Joe & The Shawl: Bernie Sanders Teaser from Nicole Ballivian on Vimeo.

Joe & The Shawl – Official Trailer from Nicole Ballivian on Vimeo.

31 If You Censor Storytellers…You Censor Culture from Why Researching Screenwriters Mattered [Video] (36 seconds)

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31 If You Censor Storytellers...You Censor Culture from Why Researching Screenwriters Mattered

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Transcript:

If you censor the storytellers you’re going to censor the stories and that’s why we get such a small block of stories that are repeated over and over and over again, right, and this makes me crazy. Stories equal culture. So if we censor the stories, we are censoring these moments of culture. We’re not allowing people to learn about these other people and their struggles, which is what art has always been about, right, about highlighting these ideas. Now, this is where we come to streaming because streaming services are finally our chance to show all the many cultures of the world to each other, right? You can’t really block them, which I think is fascinating.

Watch this entire presentation

A Note About This Presentation

A clip from my keynote speech at the 10th Screenwriters´(hi)Stories Seminar for the interdisciplinary Graduation Program in “Education, Art, and History of Culture”, in Mackenzie Presbyterian University, at São Paulo, SP, Brazil, focused on the topic “Why Researching Screenwriters (has Always) Mattered.” I was especially pleased with the passion these young scholars have toward screenwriting and it’s importance in transmitting culture across the man-made borders of our world.

To understand the world we have to understand its stories and to understand the world’s stories we must understand the world’s storytellers. A century ago and longer those people would have been the novelists of any particular country but since the invention of film, the storytellers who reach the most people with their ideas and their lessons have been the screenwriters. My teaching philosophy is that: Words matter, Writers matter, and Women writers matte, r so women writers are my focus because they have been the far less researched and yet they are over half the population. We cannot tell the stories of the people until we know what stories the mothers have passed down to their children. Those are the stories that last. Now is the time to research screenwriters of all cultures and the stories they tell because people are finally recognizing the work of writers and appreciating how their favorite stories took shape on the page long before they were cast, or filmed, or edited. But also because streaming services make the stories of many cultures now available to a much wider world than ever before.

Many thanks to Glaucia Davino for the invitation.


 

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

30 Michael Wilson – Censored from Why Researching Screenwriters (has Always) Mattered [Video] (34 seconds)

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30 Michael Wilson - Censored from Why Researching Screenwriters (has Always) Mattered

Subscribe to Rosanne’s Channel and receive notice of each new video!

 

Transcript:

In this time period this gentleman, Michael Wilson was completely censored. His movies were put out without his name on them at all. The movies were released and there was no written by credit at all because the studio refused to recognize him because he was marked as a communist.Both of these movies are anti-war films The first one Friendly Persuasion is about our Civil War and Salt of the Earth is actually a union movie. Iit’s about a union of miners, New Mexican miners who are on strike and the women who support them and nobody wanted to support those ideas so his he just disappeared right?

A Note About This Presentation

A clip from my keynote speech at the 10th Screenwriters´(hi)Stories Seminar for the interdisciplinary Graduation Program in “Education, Art, and History of Culture”, in Mackenzie Presbyterian University, at São Paulo, SP, Brazil, focused on the topic “Why Researching Screenwriters (has Always) Mattered.” I was especially pleased with the passion these young scholars have toward screenwriting and it’s importance in transmitting culture across the man-made borders of our world.

To understand the world we have to understand its stories and to understand the world’s stories we must understand the world’s storytellers. A century ago and longer those people would have been the novelists of any particular country but since the invention of film, the storytellers who reach the most people with their ideas and their lessons have been the screenwriters. My teaching philosophy is that: Words matter, Writers matter, and Women writers matte, r so women writers are my focus because they have been the far less researched and yet they are over half the population. We cannot tell the stories of the people until we know what stories the mothers have passed down to their children. Those are the stories that last. Now is the time to research screenwriters of all cultures and the stories they tell because people are finally recognizing the work of writers and appreciating how their favorite stories took shape on the page long before they were cast, or filmed, or edited. But also because streaming services make the stories of many cultures now available to a much wider world than ever before.

Many thanks to Glaucia Davino for the invitation.


 

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library